Total Joint Arthroscopy

At Fairfield Surgery Center, our surgeons are equipped with advanced technology, a state-of-the-art facility and specialized training in joint replacement procedures. Our staff is highly skilled in performing total arthroscopy of the ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, hand and wrist. Patients are discharged same day, so they can recover safely and comfortably at home.

What are the advantages of outpatient total joint replacement?

  • Patients are discharged home the same day as their surgery.
  • Patients are afforded a more comfortable environment than a hospital.
  • Easier access for patients and their families.
  • Reduced risk of infections compared to hospitals.
  • Cost-effective alternative to inpatient care. Patients pay approximately 50% less than the same procedure in a hospital setting.

Here are some commonly asked questions about total knee and hip replacements.

What is total knee replacement?

A total knee replacement involves removing diseased bone and cartilage from the femur (thighbone) and tibia (shinbone) and replacing them with artificial surfaces – metal alloy for the femur and plastic spacers for the tibia and patella (kneecap). This creates a new, smooth cushion and a functioning joint that does not hurt.

What are the results of a total knee replacement?

While each patient’s recovery and results will differ based on the quality of the tissue surrounding the knee before surgery and his/her overall activity level, with close adherence to post-op instructions from a physician, most patients can expect to see improvement in their pain and quality of life in as little as 6 weeks following surgery. It can take up to a year or more, however, to fully recover.

What is total hip replacement?

A total hip replacement is an operation that removes the arthritic ball of the upper thigh bone (femur) as well as damaged cartilage from the hip socket. The ball is replaced with a metal ball that is fixed solidly inside the femur. The socket is replaced with a plastic liner that is fixed inside a metal shell, creating a smoothly functioning joint that does not hurt.

What are the results of a total hip replacement?

Results will vary depending on the quality of the surrounding tissue, the severity of the arthritis at the time of surgery, the patient’s activity level and the patient’s adherence to the doctor’s orders. The vast majority of patients are much better than prior to surgery.

Will I notice anything different about my hip?

In many cases, patients with hip replacements think that the new joint feels completely natural. However, we always recommend avoiding extreme positions or high-impact physical activity. The leg with the new hip may be longer than it was before, either because of previous shortening due to the hip disease or because of a need to lengthen the hip to avoid dislocation. Most patients get used to this feeling in time or can use a small lift in their other shoe. Some patients have aching in the thigh on weight bearing for a few months after surgery.

What is total shoulder replacement?

Total shoulder replacement arthroplasty is a well-established surgery for restoring comfort and function to the arthritic shoulder. In this procedure, the arthritic joint is replaced by a smooth metal ball fixed to the arm bone (humerus) by a stem that fits within it.

What are the results of a total shoulder replacement?

Results will vary depending on the quality of the surrounding tissue, the severity of arthritis at the time of surgery, the patient’s activity level, and the patient’s adherence to the doctor’s orders. The vast majority of patients are much better than prior to surgery.

Am I too old for surgery?

Age is not a factor if you are in reasonable health and have the desire to continue living a productive, active life. You will be asked to see your personal physician for his/her opinion about your general health and readiness for surgery.

How long does surgery take?

Depending on the procedure, we reserve approximately 2-3 hours for surgery. Some of this time is taken by the operating room staff to prepare for the surgery.

What are the major risks?

Most surgeries are without any complications. Two of the more serious complications, however, that can occur are infections and blood clots. To avoid these complications, we use antibiotics and blood thinners. We also take special precautions in the operating room to reduce the risk of infections. Your orthopedist will discuss ways to reduce that risk.